Why Divorcing As A Senior Can Be More Tricky

If you are a senior and are filing for divorce, you may find it more difficult to file for divorce because there are additional obstacles you might encounter that you wouldn't face if you were younger. For this reason, you may need a family law attorney when making this decision.  Financial Difficulties Those who are going through a divorce can find that retirement is more expensive. You may find yourself with more debts and you may not have enough time to pay them off. [Read More]

Filing for Bankruptcy When You Have Shared Assets with Your Spouse

Married couples typically do a lot together. However, this idea does not mean that they do everything together, especially when it comes to finances. For this reason, when one spouse files for bankruptcy, no requirement forces their spouse to also make this filing. Consequently, when one spouse files for bankruptcy and the other one does not, it is normal to have questions about what will happen to their shared assets. [Read More]

Boating Accidents: What You Need To Know

These warm, summer days are perfect for an afternoon of boating. Boating is a popular summer activity, but it can be very dangerous. Sadly, boating accidents happen each day and can result in serious injury and even death. If you are injured in a boating accident, you may have the right to file a legal claim against the negligent party. Here is what you need to know. How Is a Boat Operator Negligent? [Read More]

Probate Law Services: Building Trusts For Children

If your family is going through the probate process, building trusts for underage beneficiaries can be tricky. Fortunately, probate law services can help you create trusts that are financially and legally designed to protect assets for the future. Here are some of the ways that probate law services can help your family create a living trust. Revocable Living Trusts A living trust protects assets for a predetermined period. The living part of the trust denotes the fact that the trust will exist as long at least one of the beneficiaries is alive and well. [Read More]