Opioid Addiction And Death: Courts And States Get Tough With Doctors And Health Care Providers

When it comes to finding someone society can blame for increasing painkiller addictions and overdose-related deaths, there's plenty of liability to go around. A study in 2012 found that 60% of all opiate-caused deaths occurred among people who were prescribed the painkillers according to approved medical standards and used their pills exactly as directed. The remaining 40% of deaths occurred among patients who doctor-shopped for multiple prescriptions or bought their pills on the street. [Read More]

Tips That Motorcycle Accident Attorneys In Florida Wish Young Drivers And Their Parents Knew

If your son or daughter is under the age of 21 and wants to ride a motorcycle in Florida, it is important to know that many of the practices he or she regularly engages in could be illegal when they are on a motorbike. For instance, you may be surprised to learn that Florida state law prohibits the use of ear buds or headphones, except for communication, by persons operating a motorcycle. [Read More]

What Is An Incorporated Settlement Agreement In Divorce?

When dealing with divorce agreements and settlements, you will likely come across the terms "merged" and "incorporated." What exactly does "incorporated" mean when dealing with a settlement agreement? Here's all you need to know to help you discuss your options with your lawyer. Becoming Part of the Divorce Decree Incorporated settlement agreements become part of the divorce decree. It can be enforced at a later point in the proceedings. Those who don't follow through with these parts of the agreement can be held in contempt of court. [Read More]

Should You Give Someone Your Power Of Attorney? Four Common Questions

You may be thinking about what would happen if you were mentally or physically incapacitated. This can happen because you are getting older, experiencing a medical condition that is chronic, or worried about an unexpected accident. The best way to prepare yourself is to designate somebody with the power of attorney. This is a legal professional, friend, or family member that you trust to make decisions for you while incapacitated. Here are 3 questions you may have about giving this power to somebody. [Read More]